In Review

In Review: Dumb and Dumber To

by Daniel Goodwin 17 December 2014

Twenty years is a long time to wait for a film’s first sequel, especially when there was no great yearning for one in the first place. Even though Dumb and Dumber To is far from fine art, for those with low expectations and a love for the anarchic there is still plenty of fun to […]

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In Review: The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

by Daniel Goodwin 10 December 2014

Peter Jackson’s epic foray into Middle-earth finally ends with The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies after six films, and thirteen years of exhilarating adventures. The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit adaptations have made an undeniable impact on mainstream cinema, revitalising the fantasy genre with their groundbreaking effects and finely crafted storytelling

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The New Empress Magazine Video Blog: The Grandmaster

by Mark Searby 4 December 2014

Ahead of The Grandmaster’s theatrical release, Mark Searby looks at why Wong Kar-Wai’s movie took so long to arrive on the big screen and even longer to finally appear in the UK. More New Empress Mag Video Blog goodness

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In Review: The Grandmaster

by Daniel Goodwin 3 December 2014

After seeing the legendary Wing Chung teacher portrayed by Donnie Yen in Wilson Yip’s excellent Ip Man (2008) and Ip Man 2 (2010), renowned director Wong Kar Wai delivers a lush and elegant interpretation of an earlier era in the martial artist’s life.

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In Review: Stations of the Cross

by Maryann O'Connor 28 November 2014

Stations of the Cross is a film about a girl called Maria (Lea van Acken) who decides to devote her existence entirely to God, in order to heal her brother. This latin-laden, mostly German language exploration of religion, extremism, teenage life and overly prescriptive parenting is an ungodly affair despite the innumerable mentions of the deity him/herself […]

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In Review: Horrible Bosses 2

by Daniel Goodwin 27 November 2014

Many comedy sequels have wilted in the shadows of their predecessors, failing to recreate the magic that made the first ones so successful. With the exception of 22 Jump Street (2014), Clerks 2 (2006) and A Shot in the Dark (1964) there are few that triumph. Seth Gordon’s Horrible Bosses (2011) was far from a […]

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Nordic Film Festival 2014: Review round-up

by Mairéad Roche 26 November 2014

The extremely enjoyable Nordic Film Festival is about to hit the UK for another year, taking in London, Nottingham, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Newcastle between November 26 and December 22. The festival opens in London with director Iram Haq’s I Am Yours (2013) at Hackney Picturehouse and closes with Hotel (2013) on December 7, also at Hackney Picturehouse. […]

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In Review: Ida on DVD

by Linsey Satterthwaite 21 November 2014

Some films come along with a bombastic nature, throwing themselves in your face with a multitude of bells and whistles. Then there are others that arrive with a quiet dignity, one that you discover for yourself. Ida is such a film, a haunting drama of dark secrets and family tragedy. It is 1962 and Anna (Agata […]

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In Review: What We Do in the Shadows

by Daniel Goodwin 20 November 2014

Mockumentaries are fascinating film experiments yet prove more triumphant as either horrors or comedies. From the directorial work of Christopher Guest, This Is Spinal Tap (1984), Zelig (1983) to Borat (2006) and found-footage frighteners including Cannibal Holocaust (1980), fusing faux realism with these genres is known to toy more effectively with our interpretation of them. […]

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In Review: The Drop

by Daniel Goodwin 13 November 2014

After portraying an array of characters from the likes of Bane to Welsh architect Locke, Tom Hardy returns to the familiar stomping ground of the urban gangster flick while demonstrating even further range as a dim-witted barman caught in the shifty debacles of a local crime syndicate.

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In Review: The Skeleton Twins

by Maryann O'Connor 7 November 2014

Twins Maggie and Milo (Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader) are brought back together after ten years apart, crashing in on each other’s own particular brand of cobbled-together existence, suddenly forcing them to take a long hard squint at themselves.

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