In Review: Hyena (2014)

by Chris Milton on 05/03/2015

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Gerard Johnson’s London is a city much like Hell, and Hyena, his second film after the mordant, disturbing, dismembered-body-in-the-kitchen-sink drama Tony (2009), is a dark and bloody labyrinth which nobody gets out of alive. The plot is convoluted and amphetamine-paced, but is so tight and coherent that one does not lose its thread but is instead pulled along and down by it, appalled and spellbound, headlong through a violent, sleazy fever-dream. [click to continue…]

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Competition: Win ’71 on DVD

by Maryann O'Connor 4 March 2015

Who wants to win director Yann Demange’s excellent feature film debut ’71 on DVD? Of course you all do. To enter the competition retweet or like/share on Twitter or Facebook. We have three copies to give away so everyone’s in with a good chance.

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In Review: It Follows

by Daniel Goodwin 2 March 2015

Generating fresh methods to scare audiences is a tough task for any new horror director, yet has proved achievable by the likes of Jennifer Kent (The Babadook (2014), Adam Wingard (You’re Next (2011), The Guest (2014) and Ti West (House of the Devil (2009), The Sacrament (2013). With It Follows, writer-director David Robert Mitchell (The Myth […]

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In Review: Effie Gray on DVD

by Maryann O'Connor 28 February 2015

From the evidence presented to us in Effie Gray (2014), Emma Thompson would seem to be getting into her stride with the old screenwriting lark. Here, Thompson combines her considerable experience of tense period drama and a real-life tale of a woman whose life and health was impacted upon considerably by her husband, 19th Century art […]

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In Review: Catch Me Daddy

by Daniel Goodwin 26 February 2015

2015 is an exciting time for British cinema, with works of great artistry from fascinating film-makers now emerging onto our screens at a rapid pace. The genre-bending Under The Skin (2013) was critically lauded and destined for cult status, while political thriller ’71 (2014) showed great promise in new director Yann Demange. Now we have Catch […]

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In Review: The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

by Maryann O'Connor 26 February 2015

Dev Patel, Bill Nighy, Dames Maggie and Judi, Penelope Wilton and company return to delight us with a reprisal of ‘Oldsters move to India to Age Disgracefully’. This second time around we have a wedding and competition for another hotel to deal with as well as the ageing process. The film commences with Sonny Kapoor (Patel) […]

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In Review: Hinterland (2015)

by Tony Griffiths 25 February 2015

Awkward boy meets kooky girl: a permanently rocky fixture in cinema’s romantic repertoire. Not to suggest that there isn’t mileage in the dynamic, just that you’re going to have to work extra hard to avoid the increasingly distinctive whiff of cliché. Sadly, there is an aroma that Hinterland, the beautifully shot yet emotionally stunted debut feature from up-and-coming […]

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In Review: Predestination (2014)

by Maryann O'Connor 24 February 2015

There is a wealth of potential film material to be found in the world of short fiction; some of the most enduring films have sprung forth from the pages of a short story or novella. The basic story of Predestination comes from a Robert A. Heinlein short called  ‘All You Zombies’, a tale of a […]

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In Review: Still Alice

by Daniel Goodwin 23 February 2015

All film genres obviously have their great and lesser works, yet dramas about families managing illnesses can too easily be associated with insipid daytime TV offerings. Fortunately, Still Alice is not one of those films. This moving story about a woman’s struggle with early-onset Alzheimer’s and the repercussions on her family is an affective portrayal […]

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Old Hollywood: Sidney Poitier and the Civil Rights Era

by Linsey Satterthwaite 20 February 2015

Cinema has always been seen as a mirror to society, the changes, the fears, the angers and the themes of a nation are often represented and reflected on the big screen as a window to political and cultural shifts. Selma, a film based on the 1965 voting march led by Martin Luther King, recently landed in […]

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In Review: The Comedy of Terrors (1963) on Blu-ray

by Maryann O'Connor 19 February 2015

The Comedy of Terrors (1963) stars the king of sardonically delivered horror ham Vincent Price and his esteemed cohorts Peter Lorre, Basil Rathbone and Boris Karloff as hunter and the hunted; Waldo Trumbull (Price) is running a failing funeral directors and John Black (Rathbone) is the creditor about to repossess his assets. Price decides to kill […]

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